Thursday, October 1, 2020
Home Video Can Schools Help Prevent Suicides?

Can Schools Help Prevent Suicides?

No one wants to talk about it, but suicide is a leading cause of death among teens. The good news is, schools are uniquely positioned to help. Student reporters from PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs investigate what schools can do.

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This is a special collab with PBS Newshour Student Reporting Labs, co-produced with students from Etiwanda High School in Rancho Cucamonga, California.

**If you or anyone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts or feelings right now, call the suicide prevention hotline: 1-800-273-TALK, that’s 1-800-273-8255. If you don’t want to talk to someone, you can text 741741, anonymously, and a counselor will come to your aide, whether or not you are currently in a crisis.

**What programs help prevent teen suicide?
This toolkit: https://store.samhsa.gov/system/files/sma12-4669.pdf provides research based recommendations for how schools can implement comprehensive suicide prevention programs.

**What is Sources of Strength?
Sources of Strength is an evidence-based suicide prevention program that uses adult advisors and peer leaders to support students’ mental health. It’s a suicide prevention program that focuses on building strength, support, and hope to help students navigate the complexities of life.

**What role can peer leaders play in suicide prevention?
Sources of Strength trains peer leaders to look out for signs that a fellow student might be struggling, and provides training on talking with students about issues they may be facing. Peer leaders are also trained in identifying when it’s appropriate to alert a trusted adult about a problem.

Note:
Peer Health Exchange served as content advisers for this episode: https://www.peerhealthexchange.org/

SOURCES:

School‑Based Suicide Prevention: A Framework for Evidence‑Based Practice:
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/599d959cb8a79b775bacaec1/t/5a70b88c9140b7bbe7f17146/1517336723785/suicide+article-+schools.pdf

Suicide Prevention Lifeline:

Home

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’: Preventing Suicides a Toolkit for Highschools:
https://store.samhsa.gov/system/files/sma12-4669.pdf

The Jason Foundation: Facts and Stats:
http://jasonfoundation.com/youth-suicide/facts-stats/

CDC: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance:
https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/pdf/2017/ss6708.pdf

Suicide Prevention Resource Center: Evidence Based Prevention:
https://www.sprc.org/keys-success/evidence-based-prevention

Edutopia: Suicide Prevention Can Start in School
https://www.edutopia.org/teenage-suicide-prevention-screening-programs

NPR: How one Colorado town is tackling suicide prevention starting with the kids
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/10/23/658834805/how-one-colorado-town-is-tackling-suicide-prevention-starting-with-the-kids

CDC: Causes of Death by Age Group:
https://www.cdc.gov/injury/images/lc-charts/leading_causes_of_death_by_age_group_2017_1100w850h.jpg